The Blog

Avsar: An Educators Gathering presents Raccoon Circles on 3rd Oct, 3PM

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Dear Educators,

Our monthly initiative Avsar, an educators gathering that has connected over 280 artists and educators, is back this October 2015 with the theme of Raccoon Circles.

Raccoon Circles allows educators, trainers and group workers to use tapes and ropes to build meaningful learning experiences for learners. It can be used for a group of learners including children, youth and adults.

Date & Time: We will meet you on 3rd Oct, Saturday @ 3PM to 6PM

Venue:  Near the big rock in Cubbon Park, Bangalore (please enter from the gate opposite Jewels De Paragon, next to Victoria Statue).

Agenda: We will explore 3 activities in 3 hours. We will focus on briefing, processing and adapting to different contexts and audience. You have the opportunity to facilitate and receive feedback from the group too.

Contact: To register your seat, please write to us on info@educatorscollective.in. Emergency contact # 9845026788. We will begin the session at 3PM, and will not be able to take calls after 3.05PM.

Everyone is invited to join this session. It will be very useful for teachers, trainers, parents and anyone exploring the power of experiential education. This session will be a lot of fun and skills.

About Avsar: An initiative of Educators Collective, Avsar means an ‘opportunity’ in Hindi. It is Bangalore’s only and consistently run monthly initiative led by educators, for educators. Started in March 2013, Avsar has connected over 284 people in education, arts and training. This initiative is open to all and runs on gift culture.

About Educators Collective: A social enterprise committed towards community building of educators, channeling their energy, skills and passion into India’s low and middle income groups. We work with NGO’s, schools, colleges and organisations making experiential education affordable and accessible to all.

Read what Indian Media has to say about us here:

Yourstory: http://yourstory.com/2014/09/educators-collective-experiential-learning/

New Indian Express: http://www.newindianexpress.com/education/edex/Experiential-Edu-for-All/2015/02/09/article2654070.ece

Times of India: http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31806&articlexml=CITY-the-CITIZEN-An-Avsar-for-teachers-to-02022015002018

To stay updated on our announcements and events, join us

On Facebook and follow our events: https://www.facebook.com/educatorscollective

Twitter: @ecollectivein

Googlegroups:eoei@googlegroups.com

Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeieW-fH6o85DSLFoXjR4Cw

See you there!

Team Collective

Community, Content and Creators: Jumpstart 2015

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This August Bangalore and Delhi witnessed the unfolding of India’s only congress of children’s content creators! Bringing together educators, artists, publishers, parents, writers, illustrators together to engage on a common creative platform on 21st and 22nd August 2015 in Goethe Max Mueller in Indiranagar, Bangalore.

Day 1 was titled Inspiration (a day filled with stories and journeys of prominent industry names) and Day 2 was titled Perspiration – where participants choose from diverse workshop tracks and further built their skills and perspective.

We are grateful for the opportunity to be part of a panel talk titled ‘Kaleidoscopes’ – where the discussion was focused on how do content creators build a brand and a market.

On the panel were Moti Aviram (a leading filmmaker, content developer and screen writer for children’s content), Shalini Menon (Founder of Educators Collective, building a community of experiential educators), Vinutha Mallaya (Co Founder, Hippocampus) and R Sriram (Former Co- Founder of Crossword Books).

Here is a video that will give you a glimpse of the panel discussion : Click here to view

Details on Jumpstart 2015: Click here to view

If you are exploring the area of children’s content and hoping to find a platform to network with peers in the industry, make sure you do not miss out on 2016 Jumpstart.

Avsar, August 2015: Wood as a Medium

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As part of our monthly initiative Avsar – an educators gathering, we decided to explore the medium of wood for workshop design. The session was hosted and facilitated by THE Workshop, a maker & mentor space – perhaps the only one we know of in North Bangalore.

It was great to see all of you and we welcome all the new members into the Avsar Circle!

What did we explore and talk about during these 3 hours?

1) Bringing back the DIY culture and being self sufficient. Not waiting for a carpenter or plumber to fix it!

2) Carpentry as a medium in itself – the touch, feel and smell of wood! Having to plan all resources, knowing our tools, cutting with precision and focus to build something new! Our facilitator, Anna Viegas Dmello, Co Founder of Think Happy Everyday, says ‘Measure twice, Cut once!’

3) Sensitisation towards invisible job roles and people around us. Carpenters, plumbers and other odd jobs… are often inherited from generation to generation, and in Indian context has caste and class influence on the jobs we do. The experience of 3 hours of physical labor encouraged a new appreciation for people who run and manage our cities and homes everyday.

4) Craig Dmello, Co Founder, Think Happy Everyday, says “We hope to chisel people’s thinking process through this creative space we started in Nagwara, Bangalore. Coming together and building new things, will allow us abandon the mindset of ‘making do’ and encourage us to ‘make and do’ things!

5) The medium is also great to teach mathematics (what does an Inch really mean?), life skills development, team building and innovation are various aspects, our participants identified as potential program outcomes when designed meaningfully!

6) Yes, we made a low table, that will soon find its way into a pre school for children to use! Hurray!

Watch this space for the September announcement of Avsar, where we will explore more of the known and unknown!

Thank you Anna, Craig and Reuben for hosting us and all the participants for committing their time to build new things!

More energy!

Educators Collective Team

About THE Workshop: A cross-disciplinary design research initiative. Find them on FB here (Click to view)

About Educators Collective : A community of educators passionate about experiential education, channeling our skills and energy into India’s low and middle income groups. 

About Avsar: A monthly initiative by Educators Collective, that has connected over 260 ‘people in education’ within Bangalore since March 2013. Join us at eoei@googlegroups.com or twitter @ecollectivein or FB Page (Click to view)

 

Play for Peace, Bangalore | March 21-22 2015

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One sunny weekend, 59 people gathered at Army Public School to play- surpassing all barriers of age, caste, creed, gender and culture!

Andres Armas, Sarah Gough, Agyat Mitra and Swati Bhatt were the facilitators for the Play for Peace Trainer Workshop. The games we played were modified and first originated in various Play for Peace workshops from all over the world. We had games from South Sudan, Guatemala, Pakistan, etc. We went home those two days chanting “Dibi Dibi Dappe” and “Baranga-tanga-tanga” under our breaths!

Both days passed by in a blur of laughter, learning and games. There were indoor games, games with props, games from Guatemala like “Shazam”, and outdoor games like “Lanes & Avenues”. It was liberating to let ourselves go and be children once again, without a care in the world.

One of the major highlights of Play for Peace India was its diversity. There were 59 people ranging from ages 4 to 64, from three continents and at least six countries. Participants comprised students, college graduates, working professionals, entrepreneurs and retirees. Communication took place in three languages- English, Spanish and Kannada. Andres Armas had us spellbound as he led the gaming sessions peppered with brilliant anecdotes from Guatemala. We’d like to thank Sarah Gough for translating the session from Spanish to English. Vinay P Chandra and Shalini Bai deserve special mention here for helping with English-Kannada translations!

By the end of the workshop, we realized that each one of us had contributed in our own capacity as a participant, and somewhere along the way we found each other and forged meaningful friendships. Thank you everyone- for the wonderful company, all the laughs, and for being a part of such a unique experience! We’d also like to thank FSL IndiaQuest Alliance and Makkala Jagriti  for helping us support this event. Also, our thanks to Visual Raaga for documenting the event.

To get a glimpse of how much fun everyone had, check out our short video here, complete with bloopers and all!

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About Play for Peace: Play for Peace is about creating opportunities for people to experience themselves without any fear and judgement on a consistent basis. By offering this experience you help people/children realise themselves, their potential. Learn how to create inclusive experiences for any diverse group to connect, find common grounds, understand how to create human right perspective of equity, inclusion and social justice. 

Play for Peace Workshop, Bangalore: 21-22 March 2015

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Play for Peace is about creating opportunities for people to experience themselves without any fear and judgement on a consistent basis.By offering this experience you help people/children realise themselves, their potential. Learn how to create inclusive experiences for any diverse group to connect, find common grounds, understand how to create human right perspective of equity, inclusion and social justice. To know more: www.playforpeace.org

About the Facilitators

Sarah Gough: Sarah, MSW, is Play for Peace’s Director enjoying over 20 years field work with youth in diverse settings. Involved with Play for Peace since 2001, Sarah co-authored “Peacecircles” (2013) and has facilitated training and workshops in experiential peace education around the world.

Andres Armas: Andres Armas has collaborated with youth leadership and educational projects in Guatemala for over 14 years.  He is a training and team-building consultant for universities, International Schools, businesses and organizations including PeaceCorps, USAID, University of San Carlos and Childfund International.

Swati & Agyat: ‘Play for Peace’ practitioners for 15 years and have done trainings for Peace Building, Conflict Transformation and Peace Education. Also, founders of PLAY(Peace Leadership And Young people).

This training is for Educators, trainers, youth workers, staff of organisations, classroom teachers, facilitators, parents, HR heads and more. In this training you will find a perspective and tools to work with children directly in schools, in outdoor camps, in community building, in facilitating workshops with any groups, any age for building connection, collaboration, synergy.

Workshop Schedule

Saturday, 21st  March – 10AM to 6PM

10AM-11AM – Introduction to Play for Peace

11AM – 1PM – Games from Guatemala

1PM-2PM – Lunch & Networking

2PM – 4PM – Challenge Team-building

4PM- 6PM – The Four Agreements

Sunday, 22nd March – 10AM to 6PM

10AM-11AM – Play for Peace Tools

11AM – 1PM – Community Action Skills

1PM-2PM – Lunch & Networking

2PM – 4PM Human Rights perspective for an inclusive world

4PM- 6PM – Closing

Venue: Army Public School. Route Map here.

Workshop Fee: Rs. 2100 per head

 Register on this link (Click to View)

The bank account details:

A/C Name – Play for Peace (India)

A/C Number – 0223 200000 0382

​Bank – HDFC Bank Ltd

Branch – Pashan, Pune

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For More Information

FB Event Page here.

Email: info@educatorscollective.in

Phone: Shalini Bai – 9845090530 or Shilpa Gopal – 9741449215

 

 

From a sequence to a flow: Laurie Frank

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We are launching a monthly interview series called ‘Journaling the Journey’. Our guest author is Sushmitha Sridhara, an Avsar member, a budding experiential educator who teaches English Literature at Jain College, Bangalore.

(Laurie Frank was in India in December 2014 for the Experiential Educators Conclave by Center for Experiential Education. Sushmitha’s interview with Laurie will be published in a 3 part series. Here is the first one).

From your sessions, I noticed a very distinct style of facilitation where engagements travel beautifully from the prosaic to the profound. Joy and reflection pieces are so well balanced that I felt a sense of freeing abandon after the sessions. However, the reflection continued for days. Could you please throw some light on what some of your ‘must do’, ‘must have’ elements are during a session? 

My style of facilitation has evolved over decades of learning and experience.  I had the privilege of being in groups facilitated by some of the pioneers in adventure education, and later had the honor of co-facilitating with master classroom teachers/facilitators, as well.  I still see some of their facilitation methods and styles in mine, and have also been able to internalize and integrate my own style along the way.

I distinctly remember one moment that changed how I viewed facilitation – when it changed from going through a sequence of experiences to creating a flow that supports learning.  It was when the experiential learning cycle came into focus as a tool for design.  The cycle reminds me that learning is a process and that it must start with the learner (not what I wish people to learn).  That is why I feel it is important to begin with giving participants an opportunity to reflect on what they already bring to the table with a given topic or theme (experience/ reflection) before providing new information or perspectives (generalization).  People can then make meaning (generalization) and explore ways of integrating and applying the new (application).  I try to design programs that cycle from the bigger ideas and then dig progressively deeper. Every session, every program, every class has an overall macro cycle, with many smaller micro cycles all moving in a similar direction.  At its core, it’s a simple model that provides an anchor for me.

The other part of facilitation for me lies in group development and creating an environment to support learning.  It is at the core of what I do.  To me, the learning environment (container) is at least as important as the content to be learned.  Whenever people get together there are dynamics.  Norms are created whether we want them or not.  Being intentional about creating norms that support learning and free people up to be themselves, to get in a learning zone (and out of their comfort zones) by taking risks – such as learning from mistakes, freely sharing ideas, debating/dialoguing – and experience true collaborative learning; this is what I strive for in any learning situation.  When people are honored for who they are, they can get to the business of learning.

My goal with any workshop or class is to blend these two areas – learning as an experiential process and the learning environment.

Professionally, what is your current area of interest?

I will always be interested in the learning environment and group dynamics.  There are so many layers to this that I feel I will forever be uncovering new information and ideas.  About every other year I come into contact with people and information that help me see it in a new light.  Initially I learned about group development, then a few years later it was a workshop participant telling me about Invitational Education. Another year I was in a workshop on Positive Psychology.  Still another year I met Renate Caine and learned about the 12 Brain-body principles.  This year I stumbled upon Community Psychology.  Who knows what is next?

My other area of interest is in connecting the dots of experiential education around the world, and to think of it as a movement.  As the conclave in Bangalore showed, there is much happening in India.  I attended a similar conference in Mexico a few years back, and EE is developing in Central and South America.  North America, Europe, Australia, Africa and other parts of Asia have a rich history as well.  The lesson for me is that EE is growing by leaps and bounds.  The more we share with each other the more we will thrive.  I’m not sure how the sharing will occur, but I do know that we have technology that can support it, and that it won’t happen by itself – we need to make it happen.

What brought you into the field of EE?
As a new special education teacher I was trained as a behaviorist, where I meted out rewards and punishments based on rather arbitrary criteria.  This did not work for me, or the students – we were neither happy nor learning.  I believe that a learning can be joyful and this was pretty  much the opposite of that…  So, after the first year I assessed the situation to determine what I knew and could do.  I decided to draw on my seven years of experience as a camp counselor. During my second year as a teacher we played more.  We went outside, and we did art projects together.  Students would help each other with their learning.  In short order, we felt like a family, and the classroom was transformed.  Instead of dragging out of bed in the morning, we looked forward to school – and students started to learn.

Fast-forward a year to an opportunity that was given to me to go to Project Adventure for training.  I learned that what I was doing was not unique at all, but part of this field of adventure education.  There were names for what I was doing, and models, and theories to support it.  At that moment I was pulled into experiential education for life.

What is the need for EE in the context of your work and what motivates you about working in this space?

I will answer this in the context of education in the United States as it is what I know best.  In the U.S. education for children and youth has, in my opinion, regressed in the past 15 years.  Until the mid-1990’s teachers were encouraged to be creative and support students to be both critical thinkers and lifelong learners.  Once the “No Child Left Behind” (NCLB) law was enacted, that changed. Today, standardization is the norm, and students are taught to pass tests.  I am fond of saying that I think standards can be helpful – they offer a guide for expectations and accountability.  What is dangerous is standardization.  It may lift new teachers and those who are struggling to become better teachers, but it also pulls master teachers down. What we end up with is mediocrity.

In this educational climate, experiential education methods are seen as an add-on, rather than the core of teaching and learning.  It is frequently set aside in favor of a “sit-and-get” coverage of content.  In the end, it is the student who loses – they lose the joy of learning and much of the thinking and collaboration skills that could help them through their lifetimes.

One of the fundamental elements of what I do is help teachers understand what experiential education is, why it works, and that it is an investment in learning. Once people understand why, they are then freed up to use a variety of tools in a variety of contexts.  This, more than anything, motivates me – working with teachers.  When they “get it”, it is as if a weight has been lifted from them – they no longer feel they need to choose expedience over quality, and they can begin to balance their philosophies/beliefs with their work.  It is magical.

To know more

About Laurie, visit www.goalconsulting.org

About Sushmitha, write to sushmitha.sridhara@gmail.com

To blog with us, write to info@educatorscollective.in

 

 

Avsar – From 12 to 251 Members, in 18 Months. Call for Applications!

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After 16 sessions in 18 months, connecting over 251 enthusiasts, learners and practitioners of experiential education in Bangalore…. things are changing!

(Photo from Times of India Article, Page 2, Column – City & Citizens. 2nd Feb 2015)

Here are 3 things that changed about FUN(N) Saturdays:

1) FUN(N) Saturday is now Avsar: The name changed, the content and format has not! Avsar means ‘an opportunity’ in many languages. Read the next point to know why we changed the name.

2) Avsar is ready to scale: Supported by new allies and partnersFUN(N) Saturdays is all set to go into smaller towns and Tier 2 cities this year. Thanks to you!

3) Avsar is looking for leaders: Volunteers/organisers across locations. Here is what they will do:

Avsar Organisers are above 18 years of age, actively engaged in local social groups & initiatives. You are located not just in big cities but will pave new roads in rural and tier 2 settings. You will organise one gathering each month, helping us grow and network with many more experiential educators. Over time you will build and manage this local group. An Avsar organiser will commit to a minimum of one year. You will play a host to each Avsar gathering in your village, town and city

Application are open till 30th March 2015. Please find the form here. (Click to View). Join us!

FUN(N) Saturdays is now called Avsar!

A social experiment started in March 2013, that gave birth to Educators Collective, a for-profit social enterprise . We are now a community of over 251 crazy practitioners & enthusiasts of Experiential Learning.

FUN(N) is a term coined by Karl Rohnke and stands for Functional Understanding Necessary (FUN) and Functional Understanding Not Necessary (FUNN).

FUN(N) Saturday is built on a simple belief that educators need to constantly engage, up skill and unlearn in order to create meaningful experiences for those they work with. Step 1 is always ‘transformation of self’. Run and managed by educators for educators, once a month, FUN(N) Saturday runs on gift culture. A lead facilitator shares his/her skills through a 180 minute session. This can include photography, theatre, arts & crafts, outdoors, inclusive gaming, puppetry, storytelling and more. Participants get to add a new skill to their basket, network, unlearn and have fun.

Write to: info@educatorscollective.in

Connect with Collective:

Website: www.educatorscollective.in

Facebook: educators collective

Twitter: @ecollectivein

Google Group: EOEI@googlegroups.com

 

CEEP- Certificate in Experiential Education & Practice (2015)

Certificate in Experiential Education & Practice

WHAT IS CEEP?

There is such a thing as A Diploma in Experiential Education & Practice (DEEP). It’s a 9-month, a weekend a month program from July to March. When it started, a lot of people interested in Experiential Education (EE) requested a shorter duration program. So we designed CEEP – Certificate in Experiential Education & Practice.

This course has been designed keeping in mind the many educators who want to make moments with their learner groups more exciting, more empowering. It intends to expose the audience to a wide perspective in how Experiential Education works and why it is an effective means of learning.

Click here to find out how CEEP rocked last year!

DETAILS

Date: 16th-18th January 2015

Time: 10 AM-5 PM (extendable by choice)

Venue: Gandhi Bhavan, Kumara Park (E), Seshadripuram Bangalore

Methodology: Didactic (Lecture, Presentations) – 50%, Activity – 30%, Dialogue & Co-creation – 20%

Course fee: Rs 6000 /- per person (Includes course material)

Register at http://goo.gl/forms/azEQR0OVCd*

Account Details for Payment:

Account Name: Jyoti Parchure

Savings Account No: 02231000008359

Bank Name: HDFC Bank Pashan branch, Pune

IFSC Code: HDFC0000223

Trainer: Vishwas Parchure.  Vishwas is a leading name in the field of Experiential Education. His website can be viewed here.

Organizers: Gurudatt (09739865711 or d.guru7@gmail.com) | Smita (09900097586 or info@educatorscollective.in)

*20 seats have been confirmed, and at best we will take 5 more people. Seats will be confirmed only upon payment.

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For 5 Reasons to Attend CEEP and more, view our Facebook page here.

Note: Educators Collective is supporting this initiative through outreach.

5 Takeaways from the 17th FUN(N) Saturday!

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The 17th FUN(N) Saturday (Prop Gaming-‘Flip the Cards’) brought together 18 enthusiastic individuals in Cubbon Park. Amidst laughter and play, we understood the larger context of our gaming activity in Experiential Learning methodology. Large doses of creativity, humour and silliness contributed to a great and rejuvenating learning environment.

We divided ourselves in two groups. 13 distinct playing cards (from A to K) were placed face down on the grass in no particular order, in front of each group. The objective was to flip the cards in ascending order in the least possible time. It took each group several minutes of harried brainstorming, wild gesticulations while running back and forth in turns to pounce on cards and frantic attempts at memorization, to achieve our purpose.

Here are five things we discovered under the tree that sunny afternoon.

1) Effective Facilitation- We observed that the key to good facilitation is being unobtrusive while managing to keep the activity interesting, playful and creative. We bounced ideas off of each other and asked questions during the debriefing session at the end. Participants were invited to facilitate and receive feedback. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Madhumathi for spiritedly stepping in to facilitate a hypothetical scenario!

2) Rapidly changing group dynamics- It’s incredible how much the dynamics of a group are altered under changing circumstances. The exchange of members within groups helped bring versatility and prevented ideas from getting stale. This little change exposed us to new methods, different communication styles and fresh strategies.

3) Less is more- A pack of playing cards, unbridled enthusiasm and some energy was all it took to learn something new and discover potential we never realised we had.

4) Strategy building- Everyone has a strategy, but we were required to collectively come up with one in the least amount of time. This is where we learnt that listening to one another helps. Plenty of rationalization, team building and new rules ensued!

5) Second chances- The second time round after groups were shuffled, we were quicker on the uptake; each group proved more productive with better time management. The process of flipping the cards again was perceptibly smoother because we had inadvertently figured out a balance between accuracy and speed.

The 18th FUN(N) Saturday for December 2014 will be announced soon. Here’s to more bucketloads of fun, laughter and learning!

Thank you all for your support. See you soon!

Have FUNN,

Shilpa Gopal

Social Media Coordinator,

Educators Collective

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About FUN(N) Saturdays:

FUN(N) Saturdays is a social experiment, a monthly initiative started in March 2013 that led to the birth of Educators Collective, a for profit organisation that works for collaborative change, with a focus on low & middle income groups in India.

A lead facilitator is invited to share his/her skill or passion with the group for 180 minutes. FUN(N) Saturday is organised once a month on a Saturday evening and runs on gift culture, exploring different themes each time. The goal is to build a community of educators in India, giving them a face and a voice, a platform that celebrates and up skills them consistently. The term FUNN is coined by Karl Rohnke. It stands for Functional Understanding Necessary and Functional Understanding Not Necessary!

Over a year, we have reached 251 highly passionate and skilled individuals who come from different backgrounds including arts, theatre, sustainability, dancing, music, sports, filmmaking, photography, puppeteers, activists,  conservationists, academia, classroom teachers, parents, home schoolers, youth workers, adventure/outdoor leaders, corporate trainers, experiential educators… and the list grows wilder!

To know more, participate, organise or lead a FUN(N) Saturday, please write to us on info@educatorscollective.in

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About Educators Collective:

A for profit organisation, committed towards community building of experiential educators channeling their energy, skills and work into low and middle income groups of India.

Stay connected to us on our FB Page, see here and follow our Twitter handle @ecollectivein. We are now on Google+ too, see here. You can also join eoei@googlegroups.com (Group Name: Experiential and Outdoor Educators of India).

To know more please write to info@educatorscollective.in

16th FUN(N) Saturday: Laal Pari, Film Screening

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Hosted by Beaglesloft – an innovation space for startups in  Bangalore, the 16th FUN(N) Saturday screened a film called Laal Pari, directed by Sadiya Halima.

22 enthusiastic participants watched the film together, had a Q&A with Sadiya on Skype and networked over snacks & drinks sponsored by Beaglesloft.

Laal Pari is a film follows an illiterate woman sarpanch in Bihar and her road to empowerment, getting elected for the second term in her own terms! The film has been screened all over in UK & USA. This was its public screening in Bangalore.

The intent of the 16th FUN(N) Saturday was also to understand the power of films in education. Over the networking break, participants discussed the role of films inside and outside classrooms and facilitating conversations with youth.

Thank you Sadiya Halima, Beaglesloft and all the participants for makign this happen!

About FUN(N) Saturday:

FUN(N) Saturdays is a social experiment, a monthly initiative started in March 2013 that led to the birth of Educators Collective, a for profit organisation that works for collaborative change, with a focus on low & middle income groups in India.

A lead facilitator is invited to share his/her skill or passion with the group for 180 minutes. FUN(N) Saturday is organised once a month on a Saturday evening and runs on gift culture, exploring different themes each time. The goal is to build a community of educators in India, giving them a face and a voice, a platform that celebrates and up skills them consistently. The term FUNN is coined by Karl Rohnke. It stands for Functional Understanding Necessary and Functional Understanding Not Necessary!

Over a year, we have reached 200 highly passionate and skilled individuals who come from different backgrounds including arts, theatre, sustainability, dancing, music, sports, filmmaking, photography, puppeteers, activists,  conservationists, academia, classroom teachers, parents, home schoolers, youth workers, adventure/outdoor leaders, corporate trainers, experiential educators… and the list grows wilder!

To know more, participate, organise or lead a FUN(N) Saturday, please write to us on info@educatorscollective.in